Tag Archives: tooth decay

How To Choose a Dentist

May 22, 2018

When deciding on a new service provider – hairdresser, chiropractor, esthetician or contractor, chances are you don’t make a decision based solely on advertising or how fancy their website it. Chances are you ask people that you trust for their opinions. Chances are – you look for reviews online to see what other people’s experiences are like. When choosing a dentist – why wouldn’t you do the same?

Make sure you know your dental health benefits before looking around!

What to look for:

Cost: After you’ve figured out your dental health benefits, it’s important to make sure that the dentist you’ve chosen will assist you with your insurance and help you discover what is covered and what is not? Do they offer multiple payment methods? If your insurance requires referrals to specialists, can the dentist you chose provide this for you? Keep in mind that dental costs vary by practice.

Location and Office Hours: Make sure that the location is close to your home or your work to make it easier for scheduling appointments and showing up on time. Make sure that it’s open on the days and at the times you would likely come in.

Services and Qualifications: Does the office offer a wide range of dental services, making it more convenient for you to have comprehensive dental care? The office should be able to provide you with a list of services that they offer and the dentist’s qualifications, and about the dentist’s training.

Emergency Care Services: Ask what happens if you have an emergency either during regular office hours or outside of it. Dentists should not refer you to a hospital emergency room. You should be able to contact your dentist or a suitable substitute by phone or answering service if you have a problem.

Personal Comfort: One of the most important factors to consider when choosing a dentist. Does that person make you feel comfortable? Are you able to explain your symptoms and ask questions about procedures? Would you feel comfortable expressing your fears and anxieties and asking for pain meds?

Things you can ask friends & family about their dentists:

  • How long do you sit in the waiting room?
  • Are the staff members courteous?

Before you make a decision, Google your dentist and check their RateMD.

April is National Oral Health Month

April 23, 2018

Shake off the winter blues and swing into spring! This month Canadians across the country are celebrating National Dental Health Month. Supported by the Canadian Dental Health Association (CDHA), what better of a time to think about how you take care of your mouth? By promoting better oral health, this month long event encourages Canadians to have a better overall quality of life.

Oral Health for Overall Health

Our mouths are mirrors into the body, and reflect our overall well being. Compared to other parts of the body, people often ignore injuries, aches and bleeding in their mouths. Bleeding and tender gums, oral pain and mouth infections are common problems that are often ignored. If you ignore these problems, they can severely affect your quality of life.

If you’re having any problems with your mouth – it’s important to seek medical assistance as soon as possible. These problems can be potential indicators of serious chronic diseases like oral cancer.

What are the stats?

In Canada 1000 people die per year from oral cancer. Most often, the cancer is diagnosed at a late stage when treatments are not nearly effective. By regularly visiting the dentist, problems can be diagnosed earlier when the treatment outcome is better and more optimal.

Signs of Oral Cancer:

  • Small lumps / thickened areas in the mouth
  • Red or white patches in the mouth
  • Tingling or numbness in the mouth
  • Bleeding mouth with no cause
  • Sores in the mouth that won’t heal

Preventative care is always the best option for staying healthy. Proper oral health is something vital to our overall well-being that far too many of us overlook! Take a minute to think about your own oral health, is it something you take seriously?

We encourage you to follow the CDHA’s ‘5 Steps to Better Oral Health’ to help reduce the risk of oral disease and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

The 5 Steps to Better Oral Health according to the CDHA:

  • Visit the Dentist Regularly – Every 6-9 months depending on individual
  • Keep your Mouth Clean – Brush & floss at least 2 times a day, and use mouthwash
  • Eat, Drink but Be Wary – Healthy, unprocessed foods that are nutrient rich help the body to fight infection. Reduce sugar and processed food intake as well!
  • Check your Mouth Often – Gum disease (periodontal disease) is the most common cause of tooth loss
  • Avoid Tobacco Products

Dentures vs Implants – Which is right for you?

February 26, 2018

If you’re retiring in the near future, consider making the most of your remaining dental benefits!

Tooth loss hinders eating and speaking, and can cause a host of future problems. Replacing missing teeth is very important – not only for your appearance but also for your overall health. Fortunately there are different options to choose from:

DENTURES

A denture is a removable plate that holds one or more artificial teeth. Dentures can be full or partial, meaning that they can either replace all teeth on the upper or lower jaw, or just a few missing ones. They are custom-designed by your dentist to fit comfortably in your mouth and visually match your existing shade of enamel.

Dentures are the best option for people who have a weak jaw or unhealthy gums. Dentures are typically made from a hard resin that is softer than real teeth. For this reason, dentures need to be replaced on average every 5 years. While the quality of dentures has progressed they are, by their nature, prone to slipping out while eating or speaking so they need to be secured with denture adhesive. Both dentures and partials require regular cleaning.

DENTAL IMPLANTS

If you have healthy gums but are missing teeth, you may wish to consider dental implants. Dental implants are replacement teeth that are implanted surgically into the jawbone. Dental implants replace the tooth roots and provide both permanence and stability.

Implants include a titanium post which is surgically implanted into the jawbone below gum level to act as a replacement for the root of the tooth. Once your jaw is healed, the replacement tooth or crown is fitted into the titanium and secured. Titanium is used because its properties integrate best with living bone and tissue, and it reduces the risk of infection. With proper care and consistent oral hygiene, dental implants can last 20+ years.

If you are considering dental implants, an assessment will be required in order to determine whether they will work for you. The assessment will determine if there is enough bone density in your jaw to hold the titanium post in place, and if any infections or gum disease will need to be treated.

Our team will work with you to create a personalized action plan to get your teeth in immaculate shape while you’re still covered by your existing dental benefits.

For information on how exactly teeth replacement works, call or email us today!

Call: (905) 637-5463 or (905) 332-0105
Email: info@desiredsmiles.com

When should you take your child to the dentist for the first time?

January 25, 2018

Getting your child comfortable with the dentist’s office and oral hygiene is equally as important as getting the checkup itself.

We recommend bringing your child in for their first visit within 6 months of their first tooth coming in, as tooth decay and plaque can start to show. Your child’s baby teeth will fall out but they still need care. Even though you can’t see them, your child’s adult teeth are growing underneath.

 

Mother’s milk, formula, cow’s milk and fruit juices all contain sugars.

Babies may get early childhood tooth decay from going to bed with a bottle of milk, formula or juice.

If your baby absolutely requires a bottle for bed, use water instead.

The first visit is meant to accomplish 3 things.

  • First, it’s meant to familiarize your child with the dentist’s office, allowing him or her to explore and become more comfortable. The dentist will only take a look at a child’s teeth once he or she is at ease.
  • Once trust is established, the tools used in dentistry will be introduced in an attempt to remove the fear associated with these items.
  • Lastly this visit allows the dentist to do a quick exam, looking for evidence of tooth decay. The dentist will check the child’s gums, jaw, and bite looking for any problems that may affect the teeth, or speech.

People who start proper oral hygiene habits early tend to:

  • End up with fewer cavities and gum infections
  • Increase their overall oral health
  • Gain a positive dental outlook (are less afraid or nervous of dental processes)
  • Have increased self-confidence

Check out 10 Ways To Make Brushing Fun For Your Child for some helpful ideas!

At Desired Smiles we are known for our unique Dental Program for children. It’s designed to educate children about oral hygiene and dental processes in an encouraging and relaxed way.

We offer three types of appointments for kids. Each child’s program is customized specific to their needs, age, developmental abilities and level of anxiety. We work with kids in a fun and captivating way. Contact us to learn more or book your appointment!

Tips for the parent:

Dentists are trained in describing dental procedures and processes to children in a non-threatening way.

  • Before the appointment, try not to share personal experiences unless they were positive.
  • Explain to them where they are going and talk about it in an excited manner rather than a nervous one
  • Remind them that dentists are there to keep your mouth, teeth and gums healthy.

Check out How To Get Your Child Ready For Their First Dentist Appointment for more tips!

 

It is important to start the oral hygiene process young, as the younger a child is when they’re exposed to new routines, the more likely they are to continue them into adulthood.

Gift yourself a stress-free holiday

December 17, 2016

Holidays bring cheer and festivities all around. The family dinners, shopping, gifts and decorations, while being joyful can also be stressful.

Oral health issues like dry mouth, poor hygiene, canker sores, teeth grinding, TMJ and gum disease can all be related to stress. Furthermore, some coping mechanisms like night-time teeth grinding, indulging in sweet treats, etc. worsen the effect. Here’s 5 easy steps to prevent stress related health issues:

  • Exercising can not only reduce stress but also provide a good night’s rest. Regular exercise releases endorphins into our system which promote a positive feeling.
  • Make time for yourself. It’s easy to lose oneself in all the holiday bustle. Schedule time for unwinding and make it a priority to sit down to healthy, home-cooked meals as opposed to unhealthy alternatives on the go.
  • Avoid munching on treats throughout the day. This can be quite tempting especially during the holiday season when holiday treats and left-overs are plentiful. Munching is also used as a coping mechanism for stress. Drinking plenty of water promotes a feeling of being full and helps curb extensive snacking.
  • Smile! A simple smile is known to have stress-relieving effects and what’s more…smiles are contagious! Make this holiday season, a reason for smiling, not for stress.
  • Lastly, if you experience teeth grinding or related pains in the jaw and/or teeth, visit your dentist to prevent any further damage to your teeth.

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Cavity Prevention Secrets

October 14, 2014

Before we tell you how to prevent cavities, you need to know exactly how they are caused. Cavities are the result of a tooth frequently exposed to acid, causing the enamel to lose minerals. Acidic foods like sugars and starches are a likely cause.

Removing these foods from your teeth promptly is the best way to begin your cavity prevention routine. You can do this by brushing properly. Make sure you spend roughly 30 seconds brushing each quadrant of your mouth and that you brush twice a day. Floss daily to supplement brushing by cleaning every part of your teeth.

If you are still getting cavities even with thorough brushing and flossing, you should consider cutting down your sugar intake. Cutting back on sugar can be a difficult undertaking, so sometimes it is easier to start small. Being more vigilant about brushing after meals or sipping on water after you eat to wash away acidic food particles can help keep your teeth cavity-free.

Visiting your dentist twice a year is also vital in helping keep those cavities at bay. Your teeth will be professionally cleaned and examined, meaning problem areas can be addressed. Problem areas that can become potential cavities can be addressed by your dentist before they become a big problem.

Worried about getting cavities? Contact us for a free smile analysis today!