Tag Archives: 4 out of 5 dentists

How To Choose a Dentist

May 22, 2018

When deciding on a new service provider – hairdresser, chiropractor, esthetician or contractor, chances are you don’t make a decision based solely on advertising or how fancy their website it. Chances are you ask people that you trust for their opinions. Chances are – you look for reviews online to see what other people’s experiences are like. When choosing a dentist – why wouldn’t you do the same?

Make sure you know your dental health benefits before looking around!

What to look for:

Cost: After you’ve figured out your dental health benefits, it’s important to make sure that the dentist you’ve chosen will assist you with your insurance and help you discover what is covered and what is not? Do they offer multiple payment methods? If your insurance requires referrals to specialists, can the dentist you chose provide this for you? Keep in mind that dental costs vary by practice.

Location and Office Hours: Make sure that the location is close to your home or your work to make it easier for scheduling appointments and showing up on time. Make sure that it’s open on the days and at the times you would likely come in.

Services and Qualifications: Does the office offer a wide range of dental services, making it more convenient for you to have comprehensive dental care? The office should be able to provide you with a list of services that they offer and the dentist’s qualifications, and about the dentist’s training.

Emergency Care Services: Ask what happens if you have an emergency either during regular office hours or outside of it. Dentists should not refer you to a hospital emergency room. You should be able to contact your dentist or a suitable substitute by phone or answering service if you have a problem.

Personal Comfort: One of the most important factors to consider when choosing a dentist. Does that person make you feel comfortable? Are you able to explain your symptoms and ask questions about procedures? Would you feel comfortable expressing your fears and anxieties and asking for pain meds?

Things you can ask friends & family about their dentists:

  • How long do you sit in the waiting room?
  • Are the staff members courteous?

Before you make a decision, Google your dentist and check their RateMD.

April is National Oral Health Month

April 23, 2018

Shake off the winter blues and swing into spring! This month Canadians across the country are celebrating National Dental Health Month. Supported by the Canadian Dental Health Association (CDHA), what better of a time to think about how you take care of your mouth? By promoting better oral health, this month long event encourages Canadians to have a better overall quality of life.

Oral Health for Overall Health

Our mouths are mirrors into the body, and reflect our overall well being. Compared to other parts of the body, people often ignore injuries, aches and bleeding in their mouths. Bleeding and tender gums, oral pain and mouth infections are common problems that are often ignored. If you ignore these problems, they can severely affect your quality of life.

If you’re having any problems with your mouth – it’s important to seek medical assistance as soon as possible. These problems can be potential indicators of serious chronic diseases like oral cancer.

What are the stats?

In Canada 1000 people die per year from oral cancer. Most often, the cancer is diagnosed at a late stage when treatments are not nearly effective. By regularly visiting the dentist, problems can be diagnosed earlier when the treatment outcome is better and more optimal.

Signs of Oral Cancer:

  • Small lumps / thickened areas in the mouth
  • Red or white patches in the mouth
  • Tingling or numbness in the mouth
  • Bleeding mouth with no cause
  • Sores in the mouth that won’t heal

Preventative care is always the best option for staying healthy. Proper oral health is something vital to our overall well-being that far too many of us overlook! Take a minute to think about your own oral health, is it something you take seriously?

We encourage you to follow the CDHA’s ‘5 Steps to Better Oral Health’ to help reduce the risk of oral disease and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

The 5 Steps to Better Oral Health according to the CDHA:

  • Visit the Dentist Regularly – Every 6-9 months depending on individual
  • Keep your Mouth Clean – Brush & floss at least 2 times a day, and use mouthwash
  • Eat, Drink but Be Wary – Healthy, unprocessed foods that are nutrient rich help the body to fight infection. Reduce sugar and processed food intake as well!
  • Check your Mouth Often – Gum disease (periodontal disease) is the most common cause of tooth loss
  • Avoid Tobacco Products

What Toothpaste Do 4 Out of 5 Dentists Actually Recommend?

June 11, 2014

Have you ever seen those toothpaste commercials that claim 4 out of 5 dentists recommend a specific brand of toothpaste? Do you ever find yourself wondering how accurate those commercials are or why those dentists are actually recommending specific toothpastes? We can answer your questions!

So, what toothpaste should I use?

The truth is for the average person, the toothpaste you use doesn’t matter. Frequency, technique, and duration of brushing are actually more important than the toothpaste brand you choose.

If that’s true, why are there so many different types of toothpastes?

Different toothpastes have different formulas to tackle different needs.

Sensitive Teeth: Toothpastes that advertise that they help prevent sensitivity all contain potassium nitrate, an agent that helps reduce sensitivity. There isn’t much difference between different toothpaste brands for sensitivity, as long as they contain this ingredient. While sensitive toothpaste formulas help those with sensitive teeth, they don’t provide much added benefit for those who don’t.

Fluoride: Dentists recommend the toothpaste you choose contains fluoride as it kills the bacteria that causes tooth decay, it decreases the dissolving effects of acid on enamel, and it helps prevent cavities. Most toothpastes contain fluoride.

Whitening Toothpaste: These toothpastes have a more abrasive texture to help assist in the removal of stains from wine or coffee, but they are unable to whiten the underlying layers of your teeth. The more abrasive texture does not improve the toothpaste’s ability to remove bacteria over other types of toothpaste.

Now I’m overwhelmed by the options!

If your current toothpaste is working for you, stick with it! Remember to brush daily, for about two minutes, with a brush that has soft bristles in order to promote a healthy smile.

Let us know what your favourite toothpaste is and why in the comment section below!